Category Archives: foundation

Everything related to the foundation and its events

Giving Tuesday: Mike Poliwoda

Who: Mike Poliwoda, Vice-President of Philanthropy at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute Foundation

Q: Why do you give to the Ottawa Heart Institute?

A: It is an honour to work for The Ottawa Heart Institute. When I was recruited, I had several options before me but the decision was easy. The Institute is at the forefront of cardiac care and research not just locally or nationally but globally. At the Foundation we find tremendous inspiration in knowing that the funds we raise have a direct impact on the life-saving and life-enhancing work of our doctors and researchers. Everyone at the Institute is somehow involved in supporting this important work.

I am also a donor to the institute. I believe strongly in the Institute and donate back a percentage of my salary. Because of what it is and represents, it is my charity of choice.

Q: How have you been affected by heart disease?

A: My father had cardiomyopathy, though he died of cancer.

Q: Why should anyone give to the Ottawa Heart Institute?

A: Heart disease is the number killer of both men and women. The Ottawa Heart Institute should be the number one charity, at least in this region, for that reason alone.

Share your story by answering the following question: why do you give to the Ottawa Heart Institute Foundation?

donate call to action ENG

Heart of Glass 2014

Heart of Glass 2014 : A Resounding Success

After 8 years and more than $700,000 raised, the Ottawa Heart Institute’s Leaders at Heart hosted another fundraiser. Heart of Glass 2014 took place at the Irish Ambassador’s residence.

There was delicious food, succulent wine, amazing beer pairings, signature drinks and sweet treats for every guest. A live band that greeted the guests at the door jammed throughout the night.

DSC_4485

Thank you to our sponsors!

DSC_4593

Guests

DSC_4588

Peter Van Roon

Jim Reckliitis and wife

Jim and Penny Recklitis

Guests

Guests

DSC_4556

Mike Herzog (left), Nick Pantieras and Greg Roscoe

Guests

Guests

Guests

Guests

Guests

Guests

The Irish Ambassador greeted over 160 guests in his home and while he had a long day of travel, he still had time to thank the crowd and help us unveil the big cheque at the end of the night.

Thank you Dr. Ray Bassett!

A video posted by Ottawa Heart Institute (@heartinstitute) on

We raised $56,452.89 that evening and we couldn’t have done without those who were present. The money is going towards our first cardiac MRI which will be in operation in the coming weeks. The cardiac MRI is unparallel in terms of patient safety and comfort. This state-of-the-art equipment will service both Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec.

On behalf of everyone at the Heart Institute, we offer a heartfelt thanks to the wonderful University of Ottawa students who were there to help, the sponsors and all the guests!

Sponsors
Elite BMW
RBC Financial Group
LoweMartin Group
AN Design
Primecorp
Coughlin and Associates
Perley-Robertson, Hill & MacDougall LLP/S.R.L
Emond Harnden
Investment Planning Counsel
Deloitte
Fidelity Investments
Raymond James
Arnon
Marler & Associates
Geosynthetic systems
BMO Capital Markets
Ernst & Young
Investors Group
Sprint Courier Services
Lifford
Kichesippi
Clocktower
Big rig Brewery
Tito’s Handmade Vodka

Help us achieve many firsts for the Ottawa Heart Institute. Donate today!

donate call to action ENG

Sondhis Heart Institute

Rakesh’s Story : The Heart Hides Many Secrets

Rakesh and his wife Navita Sondhi accomplished something that only a few event managers can pull off: a sold out event. Last June, the Sondhis raised $8,000.00 at their benefit dinner for the Heart Institute—on their first try!

“We booked one table for the event at the restaurant. We were just expecting a few people and we were OK with that,” says Rakesh, “But as the word spread, we realized we needed the whole restaurant.” In fact, Rakesh and Navita had to turn people away at the door: a nice problem to have for their first event. The event came to be after Rakesh’s stay at the Heart Institute.

Last February, Rakesh had a tugging feeling in his chest. It was a sharp pain that would surface whenever he did anything physical. “Rakesh didn’t think there was a problem and neither did I,” Navita says. “We worked out together a lot, but I noticed that the pain would suddenly start when he was on the treadmill. At one point during the week, the pain persisted. Any type of cardio like going up the stairs would trigger it, and it happened more often.”

The Sondhis visited their family doctor who could not find the problem but recommended they go to the emergency room if the pain persisted. Rakesh did just that and spent the evening at Montfort Hospital. Dr. Masud Hassan Khandaker supervised his overnight stay and referred him to the Heart Institute right away. On February 4, Rakesh underwent a CT scan that showed he had one blocked artery. Afterwards, our medical team did an angiogram which revealed that there were multiple blockages: one at 99%, one at 75% and a third at 65%. Dr. Alexander Dick gave Rakesh three stents.

Navita and Rakesh are grateful for the care they received. “We are happy we took this seriously. If we didn’t, he could have had a massive heart attack,” says Navita. Their event didn’t just raise money for the Heart Institute; it raised awareness of heart disease. Navita says that she spoke to two people at the event who were shocked to hear that Rakesh had been to the Institute given his physical state. They are now conscious about their heart health.

Rakesh had no cholesterol issues or family history and was physically active. Yet, his heart kept a very big secret. The Sondhis encourage everyone to get a regular check-up and suggest that no one should hesitate until it is too late. If you feel some pain, get help!

There are many ways you can support the Heart Institute. Ask your organization about gift-matching or simply donate today!

Can I Do the Virtual 5 km? Yes You Can!

This month of June is our Hearts in Motion virtual 5 km. What’s the Virtual 5 km you ask? It’s not your typical fundraiser.

Our Virtual 5 km participants will be required to do a 5 km walk, jog or run. The catch? There is no catch. You can do the 5 km any time you want, any way you like and anywhere you see fit. You can do 2 km one evening (remember, you can run it, walk it or jog it). You can do another 3 km the week after that or save the last 1 km for the last week of June. It’s really that simple.

Our event is for everyone. Did you know 52.2 per cent of women and 46.5 per cent of men were considered physically inactive in 2007? We hope that this event will encourage everyone to become active.

Physical activity has many benefits too essential to ignore. It is a safe and effective strategy for the prevention and management of heart disease and it’s been known to reduce depression. Short stints of just ten minutes at a time can be as effective as 30 minutes of continuous exercise.

While the money raised will be going towards the Foundation’s funding priorities, we hope that you will benefit personally from this event.

Here are ways to get through this 5 km effortlessly.

Dude, where’s my car?

Have you considered parking further away from work? I have used running map to track how many kilometers I walk each day from my office to the parking lot. It turns out, one trip is 0.59 km. If I do this route twice every day, I could do my 5 km in four days.

It’s not just for work: park further away from everything. Your heart will thank you for it.

Get out of the bus

Construction is mounting in the downtown core. If you’re coming from Gatineau, have you considered getting off the bus and walking your way to Centretown? From the intersection of Rideau and Waller to the intersection of Wellington and Metcalfe is 0.83 km. Getting off the bus at an earlier stop can add the extra mileage you may need to do the virtual 5 km. Comfortable shoes are required.

It’s a family affair

Take your kids for a walk around the block every Saturday and/or Sunday in June. We don’t all get the chance to spend some time with our loved ones. A walk around the neighbourhood is a great way to decompress from a busy week. You might even meet some of your neighbours and make new friends along the way.

It’s also a great way to teach our kids to be active. The lack of physical activity is a contributing factor to obesity among children. Beat the trend by getting them active early.

Take the stairs!

Track how much you walk at work and take the stairs…every single day for the month of June. You might not make it to the 5 km, but it’s just another way to add some extra mileage to your route.

If you can’t do the walk alone, here’s what you can do:

1) Make any excuse to take the dog out for a walk. In June, there won’t be any snow (we hope!) that will prevent you from taking a nice leisurely walk with your furry friend.

IMAG0357 (1)

2) Go for a run with your coworkers. Nothing says office bonding like a great run under the sun. Particularly for those who work within large organizations, physical activities are a great way to meet other people in different departments. They can even build better relationships between teams and increase productivity.

At the Heart Institute, we preach by example. Last September, our team in the Prevention and Wellness Centre had a friendly 10 km. Most dressed up while their other coworkers were cheering them on.

So what are you waiting for!? Get moving!

Don’t Wait, Get Help: Sandy’s Story

Sandy is just one of our many Heart Institute Ambassadors. She actively promotes the Institute’s great work on Twitter. Actually, that’s how we found her.

“You guys are that bright light that we’re all looking for,” says Sandy. “Not only did you save Mike’s life, you also saved mine.”

Mike is Sandy’s best friend. They met in their apartment duplex 15 years ago. Mike had just moved alone into the apartment upstairs and Sandy had been living in the apartment downstairs for two years. Food brought the two together.

“I would often cook food for myself and bring him some leftovers,” she says. “From there, we became great friends.”

Three years later, they decided to move in together. As they were moving into their new place, Mike began to experience some slight discomfort on the left side of his body. “He was putting some pictures up and he turned to me and said ‘I can’t feel my left side, I’m going to fall’ as he fell to the ground.”

Sandy held him so that he would not hit his head. She knew he was having a stroke. She laid his head on the ground and rushed to find some aspirin. As he regained consciousness minutes later, Sandy’s troubles had just begun: Mike did not want to go to the hospital.

“He didn’t want to go to the hospital. I begged him but he wouldn’t budge. I called a friend of mine who’s a doctor who told me to drag him to the hospital, but I couldn’t get through to him. I brought the phone to Mike so that he could speak to my friend. They spoke for ten minutes and when they finished and Mike put his coat on, I knew the doctor got through to him.”

They made their way to the hospital and met Dr. Benjamin Chow who confirmed Sandy’s fears. Mike had had a stroke. Dr. Chow referred Mike to Dr. Haissam Haddad who Sandy calls a true gem. Dr. Haddad gave Mike the right medication to increase the amount of blood going to both his heart and brain. Initially, only 22 per cent of the blood was pumping out of his heart. Medication improved the blood flow by 26 per cent. More needed to be done. Dr. Haddad then referred Mike to Dr. Calum Redpath who suggested that Mike should get an implantable defibrillator. The surgery was set. Mike would receive an implantable defibrillator no more than a few months after the stroke. Dr. Michael Gollob was responsible for the surgery which left, according to Sandy, barely any scar. She says that once Mike got out of the operating room, he looked brand new.

“It wasn’t just the doctors who did an amazing job, the nurse Marie-Josée was just an absolute doll. The volunteers went out of their way to help Mike.” Mike was walking in a matter of hours. He walked so much he was “using up the floor”, Sandy says.

These days, Mike is at home recovering. Sandy says that he had to quit his job but he’s looking at life in a positive way, something he never did.

“He tells everyone how happy he is,” says a tearful but joyful Sandy. “He was a poor eater, he worked far too much, and he was always stressed. But he is alive and that’s all that counts.”

Since this experience, both Sandy and Mike encourage everyone to get a physical, get active and pay attention to the stressors in their lives.

Learn more about physical activity and reducing the stressors in your life at the Heart Institute’s Prevention and Wellness centre.

donate call to action ENG

Mettez-y du coeur! « 5km virtuel »

par Mike Herzog, fondateur de GoodGuysTri
Inscrivez-vous au « 5km virtuel » 

C’est un immense plaisir de soutenir l’Institut de cardiologie de l’Université d’Ottawa et de servir cette cause. En tant que fondateur de GoodGuysTri, un petit organisme de bienfaisance, je consacre une bonne partie de mes loisirs à appuyer avec passion des changements sociaux positifs, à soutenir des groupes marginalisés et à recueillir des fonds pour diverses causes. Et je peux vous assurer que la décision de soutenir une cause est tout sauf arbitraire!

Bien sûr, l’Institut de cardiologie de l’Université d’Ottawa est connu partout dans le monde pour ses installations de pointe où œuvrent certains des plus brillants spécialistes de la cardiologie. Toutefois, mes raisons de participer sont aussi de nature personnelle et ancrées dans la gratitude. L’Institut de cardiologie a eu un effet direct sur le nombre d’années que j’ai pu passer avec mes grands-parents (Agnes et Georges), et aussi sur le temps dont je profite présentement avec mon père (John Herzog, ex-président de l’Association des anciens patients). Voir mes filles jouer avec leur bien-aimé « Oompa » (le surnom qu’elles ont donné à leur grand-père) et apprendre de lui est un bonheur sans prix. D’un point de vue plus égoïste, les extraordinaires médecins de l’Institut m’ont permis de bénéficier de l’amour, des leçons de vie, de l’expérience et du leadership d’un homme qui a toujours manifesté une volonté exemplaire de payer de retour les gens et les établissements qui l’ont aidé.

Passionné par la santé et les sports d’endurance, j’ai eu la satisfaction de participer à des ultramarathons et à un triathlon Ironman (4 km de nage, 180 km de vélo et 42,2 km de course en moins de 10 heures et demie). Je dirais humblement que tout événement où je lie l’activité physique à un engagement philanthropique qui me fait vibrer va bien au-delà de la réalisation personnelle. Cette collecte de fonds a une résonance toute personnelle : c’est une question d’y mettre du cœur!

Pour moi, c’est une façon de dire merci et d’exprimer toute ma reconnaissance pour les vies qui ont été prolongées. Dans ces moments terribles où on pense que le moment est venu de dire adieu à un proche, les miracles de l’Institut de cardiologie nous réservent bien souvent un cadeau que ni l’argent ni l’influence ne peuvent nous procurer : du temps!

Photo from Ironman Mont Tremblant 2012

Photo de Ironman Mont Tremblant 2012

L’idée de m’inscrire à un 5 km virtuel m’interpelle profondément, et chaque pas sera un « merci » pour tous les miracles accomplis. Cette course virtuelle atteint plusieurs objectifs, dont : encourager la population à bouger et à adopter de saines habitudes de vie (objectif de prévention); accroître le soutien dont jouit l’Institut dans la communauté (objectif de viabilité); et amasser des fonds en vue des travaux d’agrandissement (objectif d’amélioration continue).

Peu importe vos raisons de participer, attaquez-vous avec fierté à ce défi. J’espère que tout comme moi, vous voudrez exprimer votre gratitude à cet établissement de calibre mondial.

Inscrivez-vous au « 5km virtuel » 

Mettez-y du coeur! « 5km virtuel »

par Mike Herzog, fondateur de GoodGuysTri
Inscrivez-vous au « 5km virtuel » 

C’est un immense plaisir de soutenir l’Institut de cardiologie de l’Université d’Ottawa et de servir cette cause. En tant que fondateur de GoodGuysTri, un petit organisme de bienfaisance, je consacre une bonne partie de mes loisirs à appuyer avec passion des changements sociaux positifs, à soutenir des groupes marginalisés et à recueillir des fonds pour diverses causes. Et je peux vous assurer que la décision de soutenir une cause est tout sauf arbitraire!

Bien sûr, l’Institut de cardiologie de l’Université d’Ottawa est connu partout dans le monde pour ses installations de pointe où œuvrent certains des plus brillants spécialistes de la cardiologie. Toutefois, mes raisons de participer sont aussi de nature personnelle et ancrées dans la gratitude. L’Institut de cardiologie a eu un effet direct sur le nombre d’années que j’ai pu passer avec mes grands-parents (Agnes et Georges), et aussi sur le temps dont je profite présentement avec mon père (John Herzog, ex-président de l’Association des anciens patients). Voir mes filles jouer avec leur bien-aimé « Oompa » (le surnom qu’elles ont donné à leur grand-père) et apprendre de lui est un bonheur sans prix. D’un point de vue plus égoïste, les extraordinaires médecins de l’Institut m’ont permis de bénéficier de l’amour, des leçons de vie, de l’expérience et du leadership d’un homme qui a toujours manifesté une volonté exemplaire de payer de retour les gens et les établissements qui l’ont aidé.

Passionné par la santé et les sports d’endurance, j’ai eu la satisfaction de participer à des ultramarathons et à un triathlon Ironman (4 km de nage, 180 km de vélo et 42,2 km de course en moins de 10 heures et demie). Je dirais humblement que tout événement où je lie l’activité physique à un engagement philanthropique qui me fait vibrer va bien au-delà de la réalisation personnelle. Cette collecte de fonds a une résonance toute personnelle : c’est une question d’y mettre du cœur!

Pour moi, c’est une façon de dire merci et d’exprimer toute ma reconnaissance pour les vies qui ont été prolongées. Dans ces moments terribles où on pense que le moment est venu de dire adieu à un proche, les miracles de l’Institut de cardiologie nous réservent bien souvent un cadeau que ni l’argent ni l’influence ne peuvent nous procurer : du temps!

Photo from Ironman Mont Tremblant 2012

Photo de Ironman Mont Tremblant 2012

L’idée de m’inscrire à un 5 km virtuel m’interpelle profondément, et chaque pas sera un « merci » pour tous les miracles accomplis. Cette course virtuelle atteint plusieurs objectifs, dont : encourager la population à bouger et à adopter de saines habitudes de vie (objectif de prévention); accroître le soutien dont jouit l’Institut dans la communauté (objectif de viabilité); et amasser des fonds en vue des travaux d’agrandissement (objectif d’amélioration continue).

Peu importe vos raisons de participer, attaquez-vous avec fierté à ce défi. J’espère que tout comme moi, vous voudrez exprimer votre gratitude à cet établissement de calibre mondial.

Inscrivez-vous au « 5km virtuel » 

Mettez-y du coeur! « 5km virtuel »

par Mike Herzog, fondateur de GoodGuysTri
Inscrivez-vous au « 5km virtuel » 

C’est un immense plaisir de soutenir l’Institut de cardiologie de l’Université d’Ottawa et de servir cette cause. En tant que fondateur de GoodGuysTri, un petit organisme de bienfaisance, je consacre une bonne partie de mes loisirs à appuyer avec passion des changements sociaux positifs, à soutenir des groupes marginalisés et à recueillir des fonds pour diverses causes. Et je peux vous assurer que la décision de soutenir une cause est tout sauf arbitraire!

Bien sûr, l’Institut de cardiologie de l’Université d’Ottawa est connu partout dans le monde pour ses installations de pointe où œuvrent certains des plus brillants spécialistes de la cardiologie. Toutefois, mes raisons de participer sont aussi de nature personnelle et ancrées dans la gratitude. L’Institut de cardiologie a eu un effet direct sur le nombre d’années que j’ai pu passer avec mes grands-parents (Agnes et Georges), et aussi sur le temps dont je profite présentement avec mon père (John Herzog, ex-président de l’Association des anciens patients). Voir mes filles jouer avec leur bien-aimé « Oompa » (le surnom qu’elles ont donné à leur grand-père) et apprendre de lui est un bonheur sans prix. D’un point de vue plus égoïste, les extraordinaires médecins de l’Institut m’ont permis de bénéficier de l’amour, des leçons de vie, de l’expérience et du leadership d’un homme qui a toujours manifesté une volonté exemplaire de payer de retour les gens et les établissements qui l’ont aidé.

Passionné par la santé et les sports d’endurance, j’ai eu la satisfaction de participer à des ultramarathons et à un triathlon Ironman (4 km de nage, 180 km de vélo et 42,2 km de course en moins de 10 heures et demie). Je dirais humblement que tout événement où je lie l’activité physique à un engagement philanthropique qui me fait vibrer va bien au-delà de la réalisation personnelle. Cette collecte de fonds a une résonance toute personnelle : c’est une question d’y mettre du cœur!

Pour moi, c’est une façon de dire merci et d’exprimer toute ma reconnaissance pour les vies qui ont été prolongées. Dans ces moments terribles où on pense que le moment est venu de dire adieu à un proche, les miracles de l’Institut de cardiologie nous réservent bien souvent un cadeau que ni l’argent ni l’influence ne peuvent nous procurer : du temps!

Photo from Ironman Mont Tremblant 2012

Photo de Ironman Mont Tremblant 2012

L’idée de m’inscrire à un 5 km virtuel m’interpelle profondément, et chaque pas sera un « merci » pour tous les miracles accomplis. Cette course virtuelle atteint plusieurs objectifs, dont : encourager la population à bouger et à adopter de saines habitudes de vie (objectif de prévention); accroître le soutien dont jouit l’Institut dans la communauté (objectif de viabilité); et amasser des fonds en vue des travaux d’agrandissement (objectif d’amélioration continue).

Peu importe vos raisons de participer, attaquez-vous avec fierté à ce défi. J’espère que tout comme moi, vous voudrez exprimer votre gratitude à cet établissement de calibre mondial.

Inscrivez-vous au « 5km virtuel »